Jolly ball is the best ball

jolly ball the best ball

Natural History

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

9 Perfect Throw Blankets for Autumn

9 Perfect Throw Blankets for Autumn
1. Bouclé Throw ($ 17.99)   |    2. Dark Beige Wool Blend Throw ($ 49.99)   |   3. Jacquard Wood Blend Throw ($ 59.99)   |   4.  Faux Fur Throw ($ 79.99)  |   5.  Textured Knit Throw ($ 79.99)   |   6. Beige and White Soft Throw ($ 34.99)  |   7.  Dark Grey Melange Wool Blend Throw ($ 49.99)   |   8. Chenille Throw ($ 49.99)   |   9. Fleece Throw with Fringe ($ 29.99)

It is 75 degrees as I’m typing this, but I am well aware that the inevitable cold Chicago weather is waiting, all sinister and sneaky, to jump upon us sooner than later. It’s funny, because I come from a family of cozy types (my mom is hygge personified), but snuggling up on the couch with a crackling fire in the fire place and snow falling outside makes me feel a panicked sense of flight where I just want to run full force to the tropics. There is, however, one exception to this, and that’s blankets. It can be mid-July and if I’m watching a movie or reading, I need a freaking throw blanket on me, and immediately. So whether you’re a weird, nonlogical blanket lover like me, or you love some good old fashion autumn coziness, I hope these pretty throw blankets I’m sharing today strike you fancy. I just ordered #2, but I’m eyeing #3 too.

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Cheesy Smile

A friend of mine owns VanEss Doggie Day Care here in Canton, Ohio. He posted this the other day on their Facebook page under the heading, “Say Cheese!” Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Not One More Vet

For many of us, it would be a dream job: caring for animals all day long. However, what we don’t often see are the long hours, the stress of dealing with sick animals – and their families, and the heavy school debt load. Combine these negatives with easy access to lethal medications, and you see … Continue reading Not One More Vet


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged | Leave a comment

Easy Halloween Pizzas

Easy Halloween Pizzas

I originally shared this recipe last year, but we’ve been making them nonstop around here this month, Halloween is in 3 weeks, so it only seemed right to share again. The original recipe I shared was for all plant-based, vegan products, but we have made them with regular cheese too, and I have updated the recipe to reflect this.

These are so easy to make and so much fun! My kids love them as an after school snack and for lunch on the weekends. They’d be perfect for a Halloween party too. They’re yummy food and a craft in one.

Vegan Mini Pizzas
Vegan Mini Halloween Pizzas

Easy Mini Halloween Pizzas
Makes 6 mini pizzas

INGREDIENTS

6 english muffins*, halved
3 cups shredded cheese or vegan cheese (we usually do a mix of mozzarella and cheddar)
1 cup jarred pizza sauce
black olives
green olives
green pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Placed halved english muffins cut side up on a baking sheet, and top each with pizza sauce until covered, then top with cheese shreds. (If you want to make a mummy pizza, use the cheese shreds to form “bandages”.) Bake for about 10 minutes, or until cheese is fully melted. Then get creative! To make a jack-o-lantern, create a face with black olives and sliced green pepper, and a pumpkin stem from green pepper. To make a spider pizza, top with a vertically halved black olive for the body, a horizontally halved black olive for the head, and sliced black olives for the legs. To make a mummy pizza, use green olives to create eyes. To make a monster/Frankenstein pizza, top with a piece of sliced green pepper and small olive pieces.

Mini Halloween Pizzas
Vegan Halloween Pizzas
Mini Halloween Pizzas

Happy Halloween snacking!

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Win the Walk In Sync™ Home Study Course with Harness + Leash ($197!)

Are dog walks the highlight of your day–or a time you approach with concern about your dog’s behavior behavior on the walk? Does your dog pull on the leash when all you want is for your…



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Win a Dog Treat Bake Set!

Fall weather means baking at our house! After a long, hot summer when I depend on a lot of frozen dog treats, I enjoy getting into the kitchen to bake some dog treats when the weather starts to cool….



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment

20th Annual ACE Award Winner: Service Dog Polly

This week, doggies.com is featuring the winners of the 20th AKC Humane Annual ACE Awards. Part one: Uniformed Service K-9 Summer Part two: Therapy Dog Gunther Today’s post features Polly, a Labrador Retriever who lives with Rachel Husband in Sparks, Nevada. “Polly,” officially known as Candylabs’ Pocket Queen CD PCDX RM2 RAE2 CGCA CGCU, is … Continue reading 20th Annual ACE Award Winner: Service Dog Polly


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Walk Two Dogs at Once

This post includes affiliate links. Walking two dogs at once can be twice the fun…or twice the challenge! When the dogs are large and strong, the task of one person walking two dogs is one that…



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The problem with scenthounds

dick's dog.png

I grew up in rural West Virginia. One of the most common types of dog during my childhood was the scenthound. People had beagles for running rabbits.  The hardcore houndsmen kept coonhounds and foxhounds, and the really die-hard ones kept what were always called “bear dogs,” usually Plott hounds or really sharp strains of coonhound, that were used to tree bears.

A beagle was put in the playpen with me when I was of formative years. The first dog that was ever designated as mine was a beagle. Unfortunately, he came home with a bad case of parvo, and in those days, that disease was a death sentence.

5-to-10-year-old me was a fan of the hound. But I noticed something early on. Most of the coonhounds and foxhounds that I knew never were kept as pets. They were usually kept tied up to oil drums or dog houses or they were penned up in the back.

The reason for this husbandry was simple. These dogs were never kept to be obedient pets. Their job was to run the trails of the quarry, give tongue, and maybe tree it or run it aground.

The dogs themselves were usually quite docile.  But they were bred to make lots of noise on the trail, and many of them made lots of noise when tied up or penned up at home. Some houndsmen broke their dogs of this behavior. Others didn’t care.

But it was deeply instilled within me that large scenthounds usually don’t make the best pets. Beagles could make decent enough pets, but one had to make allowances for their baying cries and the simple fact that they were not biddable dogs.

As I have moved on from that world, I have seen a big problem that is not being widely discussed in the dog world. Currently, adoption groups and shelters in the Northeast and West Coast are in agreements with Southern and Midwestern shelters.

In some rural parts of the country,  scenthounds make up a large percentage of the dogs available, and they then get shifted to the more urban environments, where they are usually offered for adoption pretty quickly.

Most of these dogs are quite docile and social, which makes them quite attractive to potential adopters.  However, the staff at urban shelters often have no idea about these dogs. For example, I know of a dog that was offered for adoption as a greyhound mix when he is actually a Tennessee Treeing Brindle, which is a sort of standardizing Plott cur.

Greyhounds don’t make much noise at all. They don’t have much activity level either. But this dog loves to bay and bark, and he needs a lot of exercise.

If adoption groups and shelters are not familiar with traditional American scenthounds and the potential problems in owning one, they will be doing the dogs and the adopters a disservice.

I ran into a older woman on Facebook. We were in agreement in politics, and she liked a lot of what I had to say about various issues.  She friended me, and it was all fine.

Until I saw that she had taken in two Trigg foxhounds from Mississippi as foster dogs. They had been found wandering the edge of a swamp during hunting season, and they were taken to a pound, where they wound up going to New Jersey as potential pets. The woman was excited because the dogs would “never be forced to hunt again,” and they would love living with her small dogs and cats.

I left a comment on her page that I didn’t think this would be a good match.  I told her that those dogs were never forced to hunt. They were probably going to miss not being run around the pine forests and swamps down there, and they might not be the best friends with her cats. And they might not be friends with her little dogs either.

But, of course, she didn’t want to hear it. And our short little “friendship” ended.

We see lots on social media about the problems with pit bulls and poverty and pit bulls and neophyte owners.

However, the same sorts of issues apply to hounds. I remember hearing stories of  someVirginia deer hunters who would go into the West Virginia “dog trades” and buy up all the incorrigible deer running beagles.  In West Virginia, dogs are not allowed to chase deer during the season, and many hardcore deer hunters will shoot a dog if they catch it running deer. In Southeast Virginia, running scenthounds on deer is a time-honored tradition, but not everyone does right by the dogs.

Beagles are a dime a dozen in much of West Virginia, and selling them to Virginia deer hunters is a good way to get rid of a dog that is no longer wanted.

But at least, Virginia deer beagles get to live lives doing something very much like what they were bred for.

Foxhounds and coonhounds in apartments and suburbia could be quite disastrous.  It is one thing to have an AKC-registered black-and-tan coonhound, which you got as an eight-week-old puppy. It is another to get a Treeing Walker that has been started on raccoons or even bobcats or bear and expect that dog to fit in nicely in civilization.

The amount of exercise such a dog requires is not trivial. The sound it will make will annoy the neighbors, and if it is really been trained on the raccoon or bobcat, it will probably not be safe around cats or possibly small dogs.

These dogs not make good pets for the average dog owner. They simply don’t.

You make think I hate these dogs, but I have seen enough people trying to make adopted scenthounds into tractable pets.  And no, they don’t have the potential issues that one might get into with pit bulls and BBMs.

But there are issues.

Now, a lot could be done on the supply-side of this problems. In some parts of the country, there are too many hounds being bred and offered to people who will not do right by them. If a foxhound or coonhound fails as a hunter, it is going to be a hard dog to pet out. No two ways about it, and it is incumbent upon people breeding and training these dogs to find these homes.

And no, the racing greyhounds are not equivalent. Most racing greyhounds transition better as pets than large scenthounds do.  Most of them will lie around the house all day, and if you ever hear one bark, you will be lucky.

These scenthound problems go even deeper than this adoption problem. Once a large scenthound breed loses its quarry, it isn’t long before it becomes defunct. Otterhounds are one of the rarest breeds in existence.  Virtually no place with otters allows them to be hunted with dogs anymore.

The dogs do have their devotees.  But they have the problems of all large scenthounds.  They make the noise. They aren’t particularly biddable. They have a lot of need for exercise.

How you adapt such a breed into modern existence is a good question. Either new quarry is found for the dog, and for a time, they were used on invasive American mink in the UK. But then the UK banned most forms of hound hunting, and the dogs became truly obsolete.

North American houndsmen have generally avoided all griffon hounds, such as the otterhound. All of the traditional American hounds are smooth-coated. Maybe if the dogs were found to be good at hunting coypu (“nutria rat”), they might have a future as a North American hound.

But that is an uphill battle.

The truth of the matter the otterhound’s problem is the problem of all these scenthounds. They are hard to fit into modern society.

And yes, there are people who love their dogs of these breeds, but just because you love your dogs and have no problems doesn’t meant that most people will have no problems with these dogs.

They just aren’t easy, and we need to be honest about them. Nice, docile dogs, yes. But they have real challenges.

 

 

 

Natural History

Posted in Pet Health Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment