5 Ways To Care For Your Skin’s Overall Health

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5 Ways To Care For Skin's Overall Health

You guys have heard me talk about my skin before, but mainly in terms of how I deal with my dry skin in the winter or what I do to combat the signs of aging. And while those things are important, lately I’ve been more focused on my skin’s overall health. For a long time, I would work out and eat certain foods in an effort to reach or maintain a set number of pounds, which I eventually realized wasn’t the best way to approach it. Once I started thinking of exercise and food as ways to keep my body at its healthiest instead of just pounds, I became stronger, more energetic, and happier in general. So I figured, why not do the same for my skin? The skin is our largest organ, and it has a big job – to protect our bodies! Since I’ve started taking care of my skin from a whole health perspective rather than just treating its “problems,” I’ve seen a big difference. That is why I’m so excited to be partnering with Dove today, one of my favorite brands that cares for the health of skin, to share 5 ways to care for your skin, inside and out.

1. Drink water. Water is crucial to overall skin and body health. It flushes impurities and toxins from our bodies, including the biggest organ we have – our skin. Drinking water is such an easy way to help keep your skin at its healthiest. You just have to do it! If you’re not a plain water fan, add a squeeze of lemon, lime, or orange.

2. Limit sun exposure. Perhaps this is a given, but I think it deserves to be mentioned, because it’s incredibly important, and also because I personally have been terrible about it throughout my life. I love the sunshine. My dream day is sitting on a beach, soaking up the rays in the summertime. I was very irresponsible about protecting my skin from the sun in my 20s and 30s, and now I’m paying the price. It’s never too late to take steps to prevent skin cancer and keep skin healthy though, so these days I make sure to cover up, wear SPF, and seek out shade.

3. Use a Dove Beauty Bar. Healthy skin is smooth, moisturized, and clean without feeling tight or dry. That’s why I ditched my ordinary bar soaps and replaced them with a Dove Beauty Bar. A recent Dove survey found that 86% of dermatologists report that the “squeaky clean” feeling means your skin might be stripped of the moisture and nutrients it needs. I believe it! My skin often feels itchy and looks flat when I use ordinary bar soaps, which I recently learned is actually a sign of dry skin damage. Unlike basic soap bars, Dove Beauty Bar gently but effectively cleanses, providing soft, smooth skin. Once I started using it regularly, my four-year-old daughter even noticed – she told me that my skin was “the softest in the world.” I’ll take it! Dove is the #1 Dermatologist and Pediatrician recommended Bar, so I feel good about my whole family using it. And it’s affordable. Double win! Dove Beauty Bar is sold at mass, food and drug retailers nationwide. If you’re on a skin health journey like I am, I highly recommend giving it a try.

4. Manage stress. I read something a few months ago about how stress can lead to all sorts of skin problems. And while I feel like I’m constantly preaching the importance of controlling stress here at Bubby and Bean when the reality is that I’m not very good at it, I always make a conscious effort to find ways to manage it the best I can. The things that seem to make the most difference in the health of my body – and my skin – are taking breaks for myself to breathe and practice mindfulness, daily yoga, and trying to get as much quality sleep as possible.

5. Eat healthy foods. Just as consuming whole, clean foods makes a positive difference in your body as a whole, it also can improve the overall health of your skin. Diets rich in healthy fats (avocados, nuts, fish oil) and fruits and vegetables contribute to healthy skin (and may actually even help your skin look younger).

Are any of you on a skin health journey like I am? Do you have any other tips for keeping skin at its healthiest? Who else is a Dove Beauty Bar fan?

This post is sponsored by Dove Beauty Bar. Thank you for supporting the brands that help make Bubby and Bean possible.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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The happiest pups at the happiest place on earth

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This story is disgusting and gross… but too funny not to share

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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If you see Poodles in your neighborhood expect prices to skyrocket

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Golden Poodle awards for March

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Once an abused puppy, new police dog finds important job on UC Berkeley campus

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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The jackals and the cheetah and a glimpse of how dog domestication may have happened

kenya black-backed jackal

We think of interactions between predators as always antagonistic.  Meat is hard to come by, and if one comes by meat on the hoof, it is unlikely that the owner-operator of said flesh will give it up willingly.   Meat is a prized food source, and it is little wonder that most predators spend quite a bit of energy driving out competitors from hunting grounds.

Because of this antagonism, the domestication of wolves by ancient hunter-gatherers is difficult to explain. Indeed, the general way of getting wolves associated with people is see them as scavengers that gradually evolved to fear our species less.

This idea is pretty heavily promoted in the dog domestication literature, for it is difficult for experts to see how wolves could have been brought into the human fold any other way.

But there are still writers out there who posit a somewhat different course for dog domestication.  Their main contentions are that scavengers don’t typically endear themselves to those from which they are robbing, and further, the hunter-gatherers of the Pleistocene did not produce enough waste to maintain a scavenging population of wolves.

It is virtually impossible to recreate the conditions in which some wolves hooked up with people. With the exception of those living on the some the Queen Elizabeth Islands, every extant wolf population has been persecuted heavily by man. Wolves generally avoid people, and there has been a selection pressure through our centuries of heavy hunting for wolves to have extreme fear and reactivity. It is unlikely that the wolves that were first encountered on the Mammoth Steppe were shy and retiring creatures. They would have been like the unpersecuted wolves of Ellesmere, often approaching humans with bold curiosity.

As I have noted in an earlier post, those Ellesmere wolves are an important population that have important clues to how dog domestication might have happened, but the truth of the matter is that no analogous population of wolves or other wild canids exists in which cooperation with humans is a major part of the survival strategy. The wolves on Ellesmere are not fed by anyone, but they don’t rely upon people for anything.

But they are still curious about our species, and their behavior is so tantalizing. Yet it is missing that cooperative analogy that might help us understand more.

I’ve searched the literature for this analogy. I’ve come up short every time. The much-celebrated cooperation between American badgers and coyotes is still quite controversial, and most experts now don’t believe the two species cooperate.  Instead, they think the badger goes digging for ground squirrels, and the coyote stand outside the burrow entrance waiting for the prey to bolt out as the badger’s digging approaches its innermost hiding place in the den. The coyote gets the squirrel, and the badger wastes energy on its digging.

But there is a story that is hard to dispute. It has only been recorded once, but it is so tantalizing that I cannot ignore it.

Randall Eaton observed some rather unusual behavior between black-backed jackals and cheetahs in Nairobi National Park in 1966.

Both of these species do engage in cooperative hunting behavior. Black-backed jackals often work together to hunt gazelles and other small antelope, and they are well-known to work together to kill Cape fur seal pups on Namibia’s Skeleton Coast. Male cheetahs form coalitions that work together to defend territory and to hunt cooperatively.

However, the two species generally have a hostile relationship. Cheetahs do occasionally prey upon black-backed jackals, and black-backed jackals will often mob a cheetah after it has made a kill, in hopes of forcing the cat to abandon all that meat.

So these animals usually cannot stand each other, and their interactions are not roseate in the least. Eaton described the “normal interaction” as follows:

The normal interaction between these two predators occurs when the jackals hunt in the late afternoon and come into a group of cheetahs. The jackals, often four or five, are normally spread out over several hundred yards and maintain contact by barking as they move. When cheetahs are encountered by one of the jackals, it barks to the others and they all come to the cheetahs, sniffing the air as they approach apparently looking for a kill. If the cheetahs are not on a kill, the jackals search the immediate area looking for a carcass that might have just been left by the cheetahs. If nothing is found, they remain near the cheetahs for some time, following them as they move ; and when a kill is made the jackals feed on the leftover carcass. If the cheetahs have already fed and are inactive and if a carcass is not found nearby, the jackals move on.

However, Eaton discovered that one particular group of jackals and one female cheetah had developed a different strategy:

At the time I was there in November, 1966, one area of the park was often frequented by a female cheetah with four cubs and was also the territory of a pair of jackals with three pups. The jackal young remained at the den while the adults hunted either singly or together. Upon encountering the cheetah family, the jackals approached to about 20 yards and barked but were ignored except for an occasional chase by the cubs. The jackals ran back and forth barking between the cheetahs and a herd of Grant’s gazelles (Gazella granti) feeding nearby. The two jackals had gone on to hunt and were almost out of sight by the time the adult cheetah attacked two male Grant’s gazelles that had grazed away from the herd. The hunt was not successful. The jackals took notice of the chase and returned to look for a kill ; it appeared that they associated food with the presence of the cheetahs and perhaps with the chase.

One month later, while observing the same cheetah family, I noticed that the entire jackal family was hunting as a group. The cheetah and her cubs were about 300 yards from a herd of mixed species. This same herd had earlier spotted the cheetahs and given alarm calls. The adult cheetah was too far away for an attack,there was little or no stalking cover and the herd was aware of her presence. The cheetahs had been lying in the shade for about one-half an hour since the herd spotted them when the jackals arrived. Upon discovering the cheetahs lying under an Acacia tree, one of the adult jackals barked until the others were congregated around the cheetah family. The jackal that had found the cheetahs crawled to within ten feet of the adult cheetah which did not respond. The jackal then stood up and made a very pneumatic sound by forcing air out of the lungs in short staccato bursts. This same jackal turned towards the game herd, ran to it and, upon reaching it, ran back and forth barking. The individuals of the herd watched the jackal intently. The cheetah sat up and watched the herd as soon as it became preoccupied with the activity of the jackal. Then the cheetah quickly got up and ran at half-speed toward the herd, getting to within 100 yards before being seen by the herd. The prey animals then took flight while the cheetah pursued an impala at full speed.

Upon catching the impala and making the kill, the cheetah called to its cubs to come and eat. After the cheetahs had eaten their fill and moved away from the carcass, the waiting jackals then fed on the remains.

Eaton made several observations of this jackal family working with this female cheetah, and by his calculations, the cheetah was twice as successful when the jackals harassed the herds to aid her stalk.

Eaton made note of this behavior and speculated that this sort of cooperative hunting could have been what facilitated dog domestication:

If cheetah and jackal can learn to hunt mutually then it is to be expected that man’s presence for hundreds, of thousands of years in areas with scavenging canines would have led to cooperative hunting between the two. In fact, it is hard to believe otherwise. It is equally possible that it was man who scavenged the canid and thereby established a symbiosis. Perhaps this symbiosis facilitated the learning of effective social hunting by hominids. Selection may have favored just such an inter-specific cooperation.

Agriculture probably ended the importance of hunting as the binding force between man and dog and sponsored the more intensive artificial selection of breeds for various uses. It is possible that until this period men lived closely with canids that in fossil form are indistinguishable from wild stock (Zeuner, 1954).

Domestication may have occurred through both hunting symbiosis and agricultural life; however, a hunting relationship probably led to the first domestication. Fossil evidence may eventually reconstruct behavioral associations between early man and canids.

Wolves are much more social and much more skilled as cooperative hunters than black-backed jackals are. Humans have a complex language and a culture through which techniques and technology can be passed from generation to generation.

So it is possible that a hunting relationship between man and wolf in the Paleolithic could have been maintained over many generations.

The cheetah had no way of teaching her cubs to let the jackals aid their stalks, and one family of jackals is just not enough to create a population of cheetah assistants.

But humans and these unpersecuted Eurasian wolves of the Pleistocene certainly could create these conditions.

I imagine that the earliest wolf-assisted hunts went much like these jackal-cheetah hunts. Wolves are always testing prey to assess weakness. If a large deer species or wild horse is not weak, it will stand and confront the wolves, and in doing so, it would be exposing itself to a spear being thrown in its direction.

If you’ve ever tried a low-carbohydrate diet, you will know that your body will crave fat. Our brains require quite a bit of caloric intake from fat to keep us going, which is one of those very real costs of having such a large brain. Killing ungulates that stood to fight off wolves meant that would target healthy animals in the herds, and healthy animals have more fat for our big brains.

Thus, working together with wolves would give those humans an advantage, and the wolves would be able to get meat with less effort.

So maybe working together with these Ellesmere-like wolves that lived in Eurasia during the Paleolithic made us both more effective predators, and unlike with the cheetah and the black-backed jackals, human intelligence, language, and cultural transmission allowed this cooperation to go on over generations.

Eaton may have stumbled onto the secret of dog domestication. It takes more than the odd population of scavenging canids to lay the foundations for this unusual domestication. Human agency and foresight joined with the simple cooperative nature of the beasts to make it happen.

 

 

 

Natural History

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6 Ways to Use Training Treats Even When You’re Not Dog Training | #Giveaway

This post is sponsored by Wellness. All statements and opinions are entirely our own. As always, we only share products that our own pets enjoy! This has been a big month for our little Bärli. Since…



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DogTipper

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Facebook Fan Says, “Halo the Bengal Loves Her New Halo Kitten Food”

Halo the Bengal Cat Loves Halo Kitten Food

Halo Facebook Fan Rommey Walsh shared with us her story about her kitten named Halo and her Halo natural cat food experience. She says:

Halo the Bengal loves her new Halo Kitten Food! She is just 14 weeks. Born into my hands and bottle fed. Her name is Wild Legacy On A Wing And A Prayer Aka Halo, Halo Bean, Broken Halo (because she is mischievous). She’s thriving on Halo kitten!”

Rommey, thank you so much for sharing your story and we are happy that Halo is happy and healthy.

Halo Pets

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Should You Muzzle Your Dog for Your Cat’s Safety?

Muzzle for dogs

I got this email from a listener:

“I need a muzzle for my pitbull.  She is great with me, but I don’t trust her with cats in the house, so when she is in the house she is crated.  I want to transition her to give her more freedom without risking harm to my cats. I planned to let her hang with me on the couch with the muzzle on. What type do you recommend?”


My answer was:

“A muzzle is an excellent idea on your part instead of crating! My recommendation would be a Baskerville Ultra Muzzle designed by British dog trainer and guru Roger Mugford, whose Company of Animals has many innovative products for dog wellness. This muzzle has a flexible fit for dogs with wider noses and also allows the dog to eat, drink and pant while wearing it. The ergonomically designed safety strapping ensures the muzzle remains securely in place and features two additional points of secure attachment. It is made from strong but maleable thermo plastic rubber (TPR), so that the muzzle can even be molded to best fit a dog’s muzzle by warming in hot water then cooling in cold to create a broad muzzle for a boxer (or possibly your pittie if he has a broad head) or a narrow muzzle for a Borzoi.

However, you need to introduce a dog slowly and gently to a muzzle, by using positive reinforcement and high value treats. Offer your dog some pieces of cheese, hot dog, or Halo-Liv-a-Little freeze dried cubes of salmon or chicken while adjusting the muzzle on your dog’s face the first time. Let him wear the muzzle while you are around for increasing amounts of time until he doesn’t fuss with it and looks to you for those treats,which he will associate with wearing the muzzle. Periodically give him more treats through the openings in the front while he’s wearing it the first few times, until he can even lie comfortably on his bed (or on the couch with you!) while wearing it.”

After getting this email I wanted to raise the question of whether a cat is ever truly safe in a dog household with Gayle Watkins, a renowned Golden Retriever breeder and one of my Avidog International co-hosts on my dog training show GOOD DOGS!  Our recent podcast on the topic makes it clear that jeopardy for the cat always theoretically exists, especially when the humans are out of the house. On the show I talk about how a cat can quickly become prey, even to a dog she has lived and played with – but when the cat takes off, the prey-drive instinct takes over in many dogs and tragedy can happen. Especially when adopting or rehoming a dog – even one that you’ve been told is “good with cats” – please be aware that this possibility exists. I have heard of newly-adopted dogs who went after a family cat and then the people couldn’t bear to live with the dog anymore and discarded him.

So our recommendation is to always separate dogs and cats in different parts of the house when you leave them alone – or muzzle the dog so that the kitties stay safe.

Tracie HotchnerTracie Hotchner is a nationally acclaimed pet wellness advocate, who wrote THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know. She is recognized as the premiere voice for pets and their people on pet talk radio. She continues to produce and host her own Gracie® Award winning NPR show DOG TALK®  (and Kitties, Too!) from Peconic Public Broadcasting in the Hamptons after 9 consecutive years and over 500 shows. She produced and hosted her own live, call-in show CAT CHAT® on the Martha Stewart channel of Sirius/XM for over 7 years until the channel was canceled, when Tracie created her own Radio Pet Lady Network where she produces and co-hosts CAT CHAT® along with 10 other pet talk radio podcasts with top veterinarians and pet experts.

Dog Film Festival - Tracie HotchnerTracie also is the Founder and Director of the annual NY Dog Film Festival, a philanthropic celebration of the love between dogs and their people. Short canine-themed documentary, animated and narrative films from around the world create a shared audience experience that inspires, educates and entertains. With a New York City premiere every October, the Festival then travels around the country, partnering in each location with an outstanding animal welfare organization that brings adoptable dogs to the theater and receives half the proceeds of the ticket sales. Halo was a Founding Sponsor in 2015 and donated 10,000 meals to the beneficiary shelters in every destination around the country in 2016.

Tracie lives in Bennington, Vermont – where the Radio Pet Lady Network studio is based – and where her 12 acres are well-used by her 2-girl pack of lovely, lively rescued Weimaraners, Maisie and Wanda.

Halo Pets

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